Surya, New York, USA

Surya, New York, USA

(Review by the New York Curry Club)

Truly an All Saints Day for the books! If the Appleton sisters were alive today, they would surely be nodding their heads with pride at our wondrous celebration. After

Malt House witnessed one of our more aggressive pre-games, Surya was definitely ill-prepared for its esteemed guests. Our waiter Leo (@pereiraleo308), blessed with chutzpah as large as his mullet, unwisely tried to force us into the Bira 91 promotional beer (disgusting). After berating him for a while, normal lagers magically appeared.

The food was remarkably good for an establishment offering a $12 lunch menu. A very tender mixed grill was followed by some perfectly acceptable curries, albeit lacking in spice for a more experienced palate.

As beer levels depleted (an all too common occurrence on the NYC Indian restaurant scene), excitement levels escalated. The banter was flowing, glasses were smashed, and an invasion of oreo-selling rapscallions delivered a fitting end to a fine meal.

The Garrett was kind enough to host us post-dinner, and a selection of brave CC-ers found themselves at the Jane in the early hours. Better decisions have been made.

Surya score = 6 curry leaves

Food – 1.5/2 (Surprised on the upside)

Beers – 0.5/2 (The initial cheek to force us into their sponsors’ offering, and then a complete underestimation of the necessary volume for a CC sitting. Leo picks up half a point for going on a shopping mission for some extras.)

Décor/Ambience – 1.5/2 (Pleasant graffiti backdrop, and some seasoned curry veterans dotted throughout the restaurant)

Popadoms – 1.5/2 (Reasonable structure and prompt service. As ever in NYC, the accoutrements were very lacking in quality)

Je ne sais quoi – 1/2 (For some reason, I will probably consider a return visit).

Surya, 154 Bleecker Street, New York, NY 10012, USA. Tel: 212 875 1405.

Open:

Monday to Thursday Noon – 3pm and 5pm – 10:30pm, Monday to Friday Noon – 3pm and 5pm-  11:00pm, Saturday to Sunday Noon – 11pm

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The Old Monk, New York, USA

A surprisingly quiet Mozambique Day of Peace and Reconciliation. We even managed to secure a large table for aperitifs on what is typically the most rambunctious celebration of the year.

Wheels suitably greased and blessed with a sprinkle of new faces, we ventured to Babu Ji’s old stomping ground. Now under new ownership, Old Monk aims for the same ‘contemporary Indian soul food’ vibe as its predecessor, but underwhelms. Using the Club’s traditional goalkeeper analogy, the tasting menu was a Petr Cech – solid, bland and probably used to be rated quite highly. You wouldn’t necessarily complain if the chairman secured him on a free in the January transfer window, but you’re not going to be thrilled when the ball’s at his feet. For the price paid, you’d expect something a little sexier, a Jordan Pickford perhaps, offering an additional element of excitement to the build-up play and a more obvious passion for the game (curry). Indeed, many diners were unable to tell the difference between the chicken and salmon dishes and the only notable shift in flavours came with the dessert course. Nevertheless, the staff were welcoming, enthusiastic and nice enough that we will not curse them with a sub-5 leaves review.

Post-dinner drinks were somewhat scuppered by the heavy digestive requirements of the aforementioned cuisine.

Old Monk Score = 6 curry leaves

Food – 1/2 (disappointing for what was supposedly a ‘tasting menu’)

Beers – 2/2 (solid choice and service)

Décor/Ambience – 1/2 (lovely pachmina awnings, but could do with other diners for atmosphere)

Popadoms – 1.5/2 (reasonable structure but waiters again failed to understand the importance of a prompt race)

Je ne sais quoi – 0.5/2 (a hint of je ne sais quoi, needs work)

Spice Card Savings with… Kasturi, Charlton

LalMaas_2880x2304 Low Res

10 The Village, Charlton, SE7 8UD

Tel: 020 8319 3439 or 020 8319 3436
E-mail: info@ kasturi-restaurant.com
www: kasturi-restaurant.com
Open:
Sunday–Saturday 5.30pm to 11.30pm
Monday closed

Where is it? In Charlton Village near the historic Charlton House.

How do I get there?
Buses: 53, 54, 422, 380 and 466 all stop nearby.
Train: Charlton train station is a stiff 10-minutes walk up/down the hill of Charlton Church Lane.
Parking: The smallish Village car park is in Torrance Close, a couple of hundred metres away.

What’s their story? Kasturi opened in the City of London in 2002 and was part of the Kohinoor Group os restaurants. It relocated to Charlton a couple of years ago and was named “Best Newcomer” in the Greenwich Curry Club’s Awards 2017.

What’s the menu like? You’ll find all the curry favourites but Kasturi specialises in Pakthoon cuisine from the North-West Frontier state of India. Think influences of North India, Afghanistan and Pakistan around the famous Khyber Pass area so hearty meats, breads and dairy products cooked in style.

Oh, please tell me more…
Popadoms: 60p each and 60p per person for chutneys.
Starters: Lamb Adraki Chops (£5.95), Onion Bhaji (3.50)
Mains: Hyderabadi Lamb Biryani (£10.95), Chicken Tikka, Shahi Gosht (£9.95), Butter Chicken (£8.95), Chilli Pudina Murgh, Keema Mator, Chicken Korma (£7.95)
Sides: Bombay Aloo, Saag Aloo, Mushroom Bhaji (£3.95)
Rice: Pilau Rice (£2.95), Mushroom Pilau (£3.95)
Bread: Peshwari Nan, Keema Nan (£3)
* You will enjoy a 20% off these prices with your Spice Card

Kasturi PDF Menu

Tell me something about one of the dishes… Shahi (meaning Royal) and Gosht (meat) would traditionally be cooked with mutton (sometimes on the bone) but chunks of boneless lamb are now commonly used. The lamb is cooked in a rich, thick gravy and is delicious when eaten with a buttery nan bread. A dish like this was made popular by Bhupinder Singh, who was the Maharaja of Patiala at the turn of the 20th century.

What about drinks? The rather snazzy bar in the middle of the restaurant has a good selection of wines and spirits as well as the popular Cobra in the 660ml bottles

What they say… “Kasturi will accommodate the popular palette with its own Kasturian interpretations as well as providing dishes for the culinary purist.” – Bashir Ahmed, Director and Manager.

What we say… “This restaurant has brought a touch of the class to South East London that is usually only found in the top Indian restaurants in the centre of the capital. We love the food in this stylish restaurant.” – Greenwich Curry Club

What can I enjoy at Kasturi with my Spice Card?
YES 20% Discount • Sunday to Thursday • Eat-in, Delivery & Collection • 12 diners per Spice Card • Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Valentine’s Day
NO Friday and Saturday, 20 Dec to New Year’s Day
Minimum for delivery: £25 (after discount)

Chilli Paneer Recipe With Video / How to make Chilli Paneer 

Chilli and paneer. What’s not to like?

Cradle of Joy

Hello Everyone!

Hope you all are doing great. Festive season is gone now. Just have to follow daily routine work😊 ! But for a refreshing change you can make this super tasty chilli paneer. It is really delicious and yummy😍! You can serve it with roti, naan or rice. It is very much easy to make this recipe. I am sharing you the very simple and easy recipe.

You can also see this recipe on my YouTube channel- cradle of joy. Here is the link and guys, it’s a request if you like my video then please share it and don’t forget to subscribe to my channel-

INGREDIENTS

* Paneer- 250 gm

* Cornflour- 4tbs

* Capsicum- 2 medium sized

* Onion- 2 medium sized

* Gatlic- 3-4 cloves

* Coriander Powder- 3 tsp

* Salt- as per taste

* Soya sauce- 2 tsp

* Tomato sauce- 2 tsp

View original post 124 more words

Gatte Ki Sabzi/Chickpea Flour Dumplings In Yogurt Curry

Looks stunning and tastes delicious. Do not be put off by the long list of ingredients!

SpiceyAndSugaryBites

Gatte ki sabzi is a traditional dish from the state of Rajasthan, India. In this curry, gatte/chickpea flour dumplings are boiled and then simmered in a yogurt based tangy curry. This is flavorful & vibrant looking dish, taste well with chapati or steamed rice. I love trying traditional Indian recipes from different states and like sharing on my blog too for my followers friends 😊.

This curry is also a good options for vegetarians apart from paneer. It requires slight planning and time to make this dish but the end results are lip smacking, worth investing time. I assure you that your family members & guests will drool over it 😉. So let’s get started.

If you are looking for more Indian curries, do check my recipes of :

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In a pickle?

Pickles. What’s not to love?

foodbod

After reading the post about pickled red onions from Frugal Hausfrau recently, I decided it was time for me to get in a pickle! But of course, it would have to be my way. So I filled a jar with sliced red onions, sliced garlic, coriander seeds & cumin seeds, and filled it with a pickling fluid of apple cider vinegar, salt and the tiniest pinch of sugar..

I left them in the fridge for several weeks, and then started to taste and experiment with them. What I liked the most was the pickled spices, so I filled a jar with mostly them too!

A typical pickling juice is vinegar boiled with some salt and sugar then poured over whatever you wish to pickle. Then it’s down to you to enhance it with whatever aromatics take your fancy. Apple cider vinegar is quite a gentle acid, and works well, but…

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Prawn Biryani, How to Make Prawn Biryani

Biryani… delicious looking, smelling and, of course, tasting

MyYellowApron

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Chicken WINGS

A classic street food snack…

Quick Indian Recipes – Easy, Healthy & Delicious

IMG_3209 - CopyThe Recipe:

  • For the marinade: Prepare a mixture of these ingredients, and by adding a little quantity of water whisk the mixture into a thick and creamy marinade –
  1. About 100g of gram flour
  2. 80g of thick yogurt
  3. A pinch of turmeric powder
  4. ½ tsp. of garam masala (Garam masala is a roasted powder mix of spices such ascoriander, cumin, black pepper, chilli, cassia leaf, cassia, clove, black cardamom, anistar, fennel seeds etc. The flavour of garam masala varies according to the composition of different spices and ingredients in it; every brand of garam masala available in the market is dissimilar in taste, you may also find different varieties of garam masala of the same brand.)
  5. 1 tsp. of kashmiri chilli powder (Kashmiri chilli powder has a very mild pungent flavour and gives food soft red colour.)
  6. Salt – according to preference of taste
  • Add 1 kg of chicken wings/lollipop…

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Jackfruit seed stir fry/Palakottai Porial

Now, here’s something you won’t find in your local restaurant in London…

anindianhomemaker

Pala kottai poriyal is another traditional recipe .Simple and easy recipe with easily available ingredient.After eating the fruit the seeds can be used for cooking.we can use the seeds in sambar,cook it with other vegetable while preparing avial,roast it and can also be cooked with raw fruit

For preparation:

First remove seed from the fruit.Then from the seedremove the outer white skin from the seed.We can apply oil in our hands.Then cut the seeds I two..we can cook it separately or else can cook while cooking riceIf it is tender 2 or 3 whistles is enough or else few more whistles.

ingredients:

Palakottai________25 nos

Mustard seeds____3/4 tsp

Urad dhal_________1/2 TSP

Onion _____________2

Curry leaves________few

Chilly powder______1 to 2 TSP

Salt as required

Oil ____2tbsp

Coconut scrapings___1 to 2 TBS.

Method

  1. Heat oil in a kadai.
  2. Add mustard seeds when it splutters add urad dhal fry till it turns brown
  3. Add…

View original post 40 more words

Mother lode

Mother India’s Café, Edinburgh and Glasgow

Class. There’s no other word for Mother India’s Café. One night we were in Edinburgh eating delicious food and the next night we were in Glasgow eating delicious food. The main difference is that there is a special view from the Glasgow restaurant on to the splendid Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum.

Mother India Glasgow 3.jpeg
Curry with a view. From Mother India’s Café, Glasgow

Mother India’s Cafés are Scottish institutions. The Glasgow one has smartened up a bit since I first ate here a few years ago but that sense of no-frills table settings, simple presentation and superb food remains. The cafés have a real vibe, and there’s a constant buzz of energy around the tables, without it impinging on the enjoyment of the diners. Some places get it wrong with the staff taking centre stage in that awful attempt to create a “restaurant theatre”. Here, there is life, but the food is centre stage and the only theatre is on the plate.

Mother India was first given its  breath of life in the 1980s by owner Mohammed Monir, a born and bred Glasweigan of Punjabi roots, and it was reinvigorated in 1993 after the first venture had to close. But spice diners all over are thankful he bounced back.

Monir was hooked with the restaurant industry when he started working at his brother’s restaurant at weekends while still at school. A couple of failed attempts with his own venues – the first at just 18 – honed his business skills. And cooking for his parents in Pakistan honed his cooking skills and gave him an insight into how to create a winning menu. This is a man who grew up enjoying chips, deep-fried pizza and jam butties as much as his mum’s curries so it’s no wonder he doesn’t just churn out old-school favourites.

Both cafés use a tapas style menu – smaller dishes in the Spanish style so you can enjoy a nice range of tastes on the table. With prices for each dish about £4-6, this is the place to tuck in.

So in Edinburgh’s it’s a rich Methi Keema Mutter (£5.55), a super tangy Chicken Achari (£5.45), a classic and creamy Sag Paneer (£4.45), fried rice (£2.25), chapati (95p) and mixed pickle (95p), while in Glasgow it’s an on-the-bone chicken Staff Curry (£5.95), an amazing and unusual Smoked Chicken with Peas (£5.80), another Sag Paneer (£4.60), a garlic nan (£1.85), boiled rice (£1.85) and some mixed picked (95p). It all sounds pretty straightforward but these are two of the best curries I have ever had. The mix of tastes, the joy of a shared experience with a friend as you swap thoughts on the merits of each dish (the Smoked Chicken was declared king of the tables) and the constant background buzz of happy curry diners adds up to great meals.

Mother India Glasgow 1.jpeg
Simply presented, simply delicious

This tapas approach has to be the way forward for other restaurants (the above, even with a couple of Kingfishers, came to only £27.45 and £29 respectively) as curry houses battle to find their niché among today’s diners.

Mother India’s Cafe, 3-5 Infirmary Street, Edinburgh, EH1 1LT.
Tel: 0131 524 9801. Open: Sun to Thurs noon–10pm, Fri to Sat noon–10.30pm.

Mother India’s Cafe, 3-5 Infirmary Street, Edinburgh, EH1 1LT. Tel: 0131 524 9801. Open: Mon to Weds noon–2pm and 5pm to 10.30pm (last orders), Thurs noon–10.30pm (last orders), Fri to Sat noon–11pm (last orders), Sun noon–10pm (last orders).

Scores on the tandoors
Food 9.5
Service 8.5
Decor 8
Vibe 9.5 (Friday night and Saturday night)
Value 10

 

 

 

Smoked Aubergine and Fenugreek Pie or Beetroot and Egg Salad