In a pickle?

Pickles. What’s not to love?

foodbod

After reading the post about pickled red onions from Frugal Hausfrau recently, I decided it was time for me to get in a pickle! But of course, it would have to be my way. So I filled a jar with sliced red onions, sliced garlic, coriander seeds & cumin seeds, and filled it with a pickling fluid of apple cider vinegar, salt and the tiniest pinch of sugar..

I left them in the fridge for several weeks, and then started to taste and experiment with them. What I liked the most was the pickled spices, so I filled a jar with mostly them too!

A typical pickling juice is vinegar boiled with some salt and sugar then poured over whatever you wish to pickle. Then it’s down to you to enhance it with whatever aromatics take your fancy. Apple cider vinegar is quite a gentle acid, and works well, but…

View original post 236 more words

Advertisements

Village gem

Bengal Lounge, Wrecclesham, Surrey

What a great find this restaurant is. Unless you live in this village or nearby, of course, in which case you’ll know all about it. https://wordpress.com/post/greenwichcurryclub.com/4931

Housed in a former pub, and retaining all the interior nooks and crannies and split levels that make (or made in this case) country pubs so appealing, the Bengal Lounge is a gem with some great food. Smart and modern, and, so the owner told me, operating for umpteen years, this is clearly a popular place among locals. It’s got a bit of that local feel to it as if everyone knows each other (as perhaps they did when it was a pub) so expect a few of those “who are they?” looks.

You can also enjoy a huge car park and one of those huge menus too (something for everyone). I must say I’m usually a little suspicious of those (huge menus not huge car parks) with the obvious thought being that can a place really cook all those dishes really well? But on that front I was wrong (at least with the dishes we tried but I’ll report back when I’ve worked through the rest of the 158 items listed on the menu).

The Chicken Dhansak (£6.95) was declared as good as the best from the Dhansak lovers, the Lamb Shashlick (£8.50) was succulent and fresh, as this kebab should be, and the Mishti Kodhu Bhaji  (sweet butternut, £3.50) a delight of a side dish. Based on the experience of the latter two dishes mentioned the Lamb Mishti Khodu (£9.95) is a must try next time.

The service was friendly, if a bit random at time (loads of waiters, so you never know who is supposed to be doing what). But, hey, we’re not locals yet so I’m sure we’ll work this little thing out.

Bengal Lounge, 1 The Street, Wrecclesham, Farnham, Surrey, GU10 4PP. Tel: 01252 713222. Open: daily noon–2pm and 5.30pm–11pm (10.30pm Sundays).

Scores on the Tandoors
Food 8.5
Service 7
Decor 8.5
Vibe (early Saturday night) 7
Value 8

Mr Grumpy’s best curry

Royal Nepalese, SE3

There really is very little going on commercially as you come out of Westcombe Park Station – and yet two spice restaurants have continued to operate in this little parade for years. And the reason is quite simple: they are both rather good. Coriander (that’s the one on the right as you exit the station) is well known but make no mistake, the Royal Nepalese, which has been operating since 2004, has plenty of its own fans.

The restaurant was packed on the night the Curry Club visited and with good reason because the food is excellent. So much so that one member declared that his choice was the best curry he had for years (he had the Langtang Lamb, £8.50, by the way). And considering this particular member would be described by Blackadder as the grumpiest Mr Grumpy from Grumpy Street in Grumpy Town this is some compliment.Needless to say, a range of Nepalese dishes dominate to chef’s recommendations such as the well-known green herb lamb dish Nepalese Khutta (£8.50) and the Royal Mismass Karahi (£8.50), an interesting combination of barbequed chicken, lamb, sheek kebab and prawns.

Other thumbs up go must to the large Prawn Puri starter (£5.95) which could be enough for a dinner for some people and the tender Squid starter, while the Chicken Chilli Dry Fry (£8.50) was delicious. As the name suggest, it’s not for those who like their meat smothered in sauce but with a beautiful coating of marinade the chicken is delicious and set off beautifully with chunks of pepper and onion. Needlesss to say it had friends on my table reaching across for a taste of something just a little bit different to the old-school favourites.

Royal Nepalese, 2–4 Station Cres, Blackheath, SE3 7EQ. Tel: 020 8269 0505. E-mail: info@royalnepalese.com. Open: daily 5.30pm – 11pm.

Scores on the tandoors
Food 8.5
Service and friendliness 9
Decor 8
Vibe 8 (Tuesday night)
Value 8.5

Prawn Biryani, How to Make Prawn Biryani

Biryani… delicious looking, smelling and, of course, tasting

MyYellowApron

View original post 639 more words

Chicken WINGS

A classic street food snack…

Quick Indian recipes – Easy,healthy,delicious

IMG_3209 - CopyThe Recipe:

  • For the marinade: Prepare a mixture of these ingredients, and by adding a little quantity of water whisk the mixture into a thick and creamy marinade –
  1. About 100g of gram flour
  2. 80g of thick yogurt
  3. A pinch of turmeric powder
  4. ½ tsp. of garam masala (Garam masala is a roasted powder mix of spices such ascoriander, cumin, black pepper, chilli, cassia leaf, cassia, clove, black cardamom, anistar, fennel seeds etc. The flavour of garam masala varies according to the composition of different spices and ingredients in it; every brand of garam masala available in the market is dissimilar in taste, you may also find different varieties of garam masala of the same brand.)
  5. 1 tsp. of kashmiri chilli powder (Kashmiri chilli powder has a very mild pungent flavour and gives food soft red colour.)
  6. Salt – according to preference of taste
  • Add 1 kg of chicken wings/lollipop…

View original post 100 more words

Jackfruit seed stir fry/Palakottai Porial

Now, here’s something you won’t find in your local restaurant in London…

anindianhomemaker

Pala kottai poriyal is another traditional recipe .Simple and easy recipe with easily available ingredient.After eating the fruit the seeds can be used for cooking.we can use the seeds in sambar,cook it with other vegetable while preparing avial,roast it and can also be cooked with raw fruit

For preparation:

First remove seed from the fruit.Then from the seedremove the outer white skin from the seed.We can apply oil in our hands.Then cut the seeds I two..we can cook it separately or else can cook while cooking riceIf it is tender 2 or 3 whistles is enough or else few more whistles.

ingredients:

Palakottai________25 nos

Mustard seeds____3/4 tsp

Urad dhal_________1/2 TSP

Onion _____________2

Curry leaves________few

Chilly powder______1 to 2 TSP

Salt as required

Oil ____2tbsp

Coconut scrapings___1 to 2 TBS.

Method

  1. Heat oil in a kadai.
  2. Add mustard seeds when it splutters add urad dhal fry till it turns brown
  3. Add…

View original post 40 more words

Johney come…

Johney Gurkha, Aldershot

The first time I went to Johney Gurkha was many years ago after a recommendation from a Gurkha friend of mine who lives in Aldershot, home of the British army and now home to many thousands from the Nepalese community.

“Straight up Victoria Road,” he advised. “It’s not called Johney Gurkha anymore, it’s called, er, er, something else. But just ask anyone, that’s what everyone still calls it.”

So my first visit to the famous Johney Gurkha was actually to Gurkha Raj Doot. But nobody ever called it that – even the legendary curry man Pat Chapman queried the strange name change a few years back in his Good Curry Guide – so I’m delighted that the owners have seen sense and reverted the name back.

Johney Gurkhas 16-04-2017, 09 37 20 copy  Johney Gurkhas 16-04-2017, 09 38 32 copy

Frankly, though, the name is about the only thing that has changed in this legendary place for years. It’s stuck in time – and all the better for it.

The restaurant is downstairs and apart from a few bits and pieces in the upstairs area as you enter – notably an imposing kukri on the wall – you could be forgiven for wondering where the welcome is. I’m sure that more than a few people have wandered out at this stage without even venturing downstairs. Not those in the know.

The decor is basic, the service functional and the portions are large and tasty. It’s always packed.

You might have to wait for a table at busy times (although the turnaround is usually pretty quick) and you might have to wait a bit for your food sometimes. But, then, that’s what Gurkha beer (from West Sussex) is for.

Now, I know Chicken Tikka Masala is popular but I have never seen three versions on the menu: a classic version (£7.25), a Kathmandu Style version (£7.95) and a Johney Gurkha version (£7.95). Well, after all this stuff about the name it had to be the latter, which tasted, well, like Chicken Tikka Masala. Sticking with the name theme we added a Gurkhali Lamb Chilli (£7.95), and the darker, thick sauce was a good addition to the table to go with the creamy masala. Sadly there was no rice with a Johney or Gurkha prefix so it was a good old pilau rice (£2.35) and an extremely large raita (£2.90) to complete the line-up.

The food was as hearty and tasty as it always is and it certainly looked like everyone around us agreed in what was clearly just another successful night downstairs in Victoria Road. Some things should never change. And certainly not the name.

Johney Gurkhas 16-04-2017, 09 39 36 copy

Johney Gurkha, 186 Victoria Road, Aldershot, GU11 1JZ. Tel: 01252 328773. Open: Mon to Sun 5.30pm – 11pm.

Scores on the tandoors
Food 7.5
Service 7
Decor 5
Vibe (Saturday night) 9
Value 8